Tag Archives: Performance Art

Philly Trek #14, Treatment #10 – Performance Art

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It’s been a while since I have shared a straight up report on my cross-country treks for medical care. I made my initial visit to Philadelphia, Trek # 1, the first week of April 2013  – a pre-intake intake, hoping to position myself, finally, for admission into the Autologous OC-DC Vaccine Phase One Clinical Trial. I had pursued entrance to this trial for the prior 20 months. We had heard a lot of “no’s” but now we were hearing “yes, maybe.” My cancer was looking stable enough to gain me entrance even if I was still amid my first recurrence. Eleven months later, still amid my first recurrence, it was time for Philly Trek #14, Treatment #10.

Often I have felt like a performance artist when completing my Philly Treks. Now, I model the courageous patient, now I crumble in a hospital bed, and don’t look now, because here the heroine, me, weeps on a crowded bridge as she shakes and vomits up her pathetic orange juice in the fresh snow – again and again and again and again, leaving a small and dainty pattern of no great offence. I, the artist, then continue on towards my housing and a new day that can only be better.

Performance Art

Performance Art

Trek 14, the February trek described in the paragraph above, was not dainty. It’s start was delayed a week by a last minute call from UPenn telling me to find new flights. My luggage already stood packed at the door as I awaited my ride to the airport. A bodacious storm (adjective lifted from one weather forecast) was predicted for the final day of my scheduled treatment, a day that requires a team of ten exact people to be at their posts. The Philadelphia weather projection made complete attendance unlikely. Cancelled, I was.

There could be no complications for my new treatment dates the next week or I would be out of compliance with the trial. Weather forecasts looked good at all ends of my travel but the night before my early morning flight to Philly an airline email informed me both flights were cancelled. I got the last seat in the last flights of the next day, feeling lucky, until I arrived at the Denver airport to see FLIGHT CANCELLED in the monitor. Yes, three flights cancelled in less than 24 hours and the weather was mighty tame. I rushed for assistance only to find not only no assistance but also rudeness. Southwest Airlines, I learn, does not shift you to another airline – and their next flight out to Philly was in 36 hours – too late for me to meet the chemo requirement. When I tried to engage them in problem solving (possible flights that might get me towards Philly on their airline) they said “no” and literally turned their backs on me. Oh my.

Only MY flight cancelled!

Only MY flight cancelled!

While a friend, just completing her own not fun medical procedure, stepped in to problem solve options over the phone, I still felt alone and very, very stressed – this was happening on top of a full week of travel stresses. After an additional $500 of expense and a few tense hours later I was set for the only remaining flight to leave the Denver airport for Philadelphia that night. It was on United and I arrived so late that the trains had stopped running requiring the additional expense of a cab. I was a wreck.

I showed up to treatment the next morning already sick with a migraine. My health did not improve but I did value the team’s dedication to easing my pain.

I decided the rigors of travel on top of treatment just might be too much for this gal.

I have testing and results along with my March treatment – always a dicey combination. My sister volunteered to fly in. It should be a great time to assess. My lab work continues to insinuate disease progression. My December tests were highly contradictory. Maybe this month’s results will offer clarity, always welcome.

What will the tests reveal?

What will the tests reveal?

I have had enough time and new information to feel calm with any outcome.

I am tired of travelling cross-country for monthly medical care and, luckily, this isn’t an endless drill. I either close out Part One in the near future, earning a travel break, or it’s time to move on to Part Two. The adventures of Part Two, T-Cell Infusion, dull travel concerns since I will be grounded in Philly until recovered which could take up to six weeks.

So, stay tuned for what comes next.images-2